©

“I think the average guy thinks they’re pro-woman, just because they think they’re a nice guy and someone has told them that they’re awesome. But the truth is far from it. Unless you are actively, consciously working against the gravitational pull of the culture, you will predictably, thematically, create these sort of fucked-up representations.” —

Junot Diaz (via frizzfelon)

Unless you are actively, consciously working against the gravitational pull of the culture, you will predictably, thematically, create these sort of fucked-up representations.



thebicker:

Federal judge allows terminally ill woman to marry her partner seven months before same-sex marriage becomes legal in Illinois
Vernita Gray’s breast cancer metastasized to her bones and brain. Her dying wish is to marry her partner, Patricia Ewert. A federal judge mandated that Cook County, Illinois immediately issue them a marriage license. David Orr, the Cook County Clerk, said he was thrilled “at long last” to be able to issue a same-sex marriage certificate. As soon as Gray feels well enough to leave chemotherapy, they’ll get married.

thebicker:

Federal judge allows terminally ill woman to marry her partner seven months before same-sex marriage becomes legal in Illinois

Vernita Gray’s breast cancer metastasized to her bones and brain. Her dying wish is to marry her partner, Patricia Ewert. A federal judge mandated that Cook County, Illinois immediately issue them a marriage license. David Orr, the Cook County Clerk, said he was thrilled “at long last” to be able to issue a same-sex marriage certificate. As soon as Gray feels well enough to leave chemotherapy, they’ll get married.



buttonpoetry:

Sibel Sayiner & Violet Trachtenberg - “Pride” (CUPSI 2014)

"There is more to celebrate than a parade. There are voices to be heard that cannot make their way to these limousines."

Performing for Stanford University during prelims at the 2014 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational.



If you’re poor, the only way you’re likely to injure someone is the old traditional way: artisanal violence, we could call it – by hands, by knife, by club, or maybe modern hands-on violence, by gun or by car.

But if you’re tremendously wealthy, you can practice industrial-scale violence without any manual labor on your own part. You can, say, build a sweatshop factory that will collapse in Bangladesh and kill more people than any hands-on mass murderer ever did, or you can calculate risk and benefit about putting poisons or unsafe machines into the world, as manufacturers do every day. If you’re the leader of a country, you can declare war and kill by the hundreds of thousands or millions. And the nuclear superpowers – the US and Russia – still hold the option of destroying quite a lot of life on Earth.

So do the carbon barons. But when we talk about violence, we almost always talk about violence from below, not above.

Or so I thought when I received a press release last week from a climate group announcing that ” scientists say there is a direct link between changing climate and an increase in violence”. What the scientists actually said, in a not-so-newsworthy article in Nature two and a half years ago, is that there is higher conflict in the tropics in El Nino years, and that perhaps this will scale up to make our age of climate change also an era of civil and international conflict.

The message is that ordinary people will behave badly in an era of intensified climate change.

” — Let’s Call Climate Change What It Really Is — Violence | Alternet (via guerrillamamamedicine)



mytongueisforked:

snarkbender:

petitepasserine:

white women of hollywood, reducing japan and japanese culture to cupcakes, sexy ”costumes” and submissive sex-kittens since god knows when

white people, this is why nobody trusts you

yeah, so white women fetishize, objectify, and commodify woc as well and treat us like props.

this is why we don’t trust you. 



transrants:

socialistexan:

This is what the cast of a Stonewall movie should look like, not what’s being cast.

These are just a few of the beautiful, incredible, unbelievably brave people who made our movement possible. Pay respect to the people who were involved in the Stonewall Riots by boycotting this planned whitewashed film about cis gay men and drag queens because it’s false and disrespectful to the trans women of color and the other extremely important marginalized groups that sparked the movement we have and benefit from today. Don’t allow this movie to further perpetuate the whitewashing of history and lies about who really was fighting in the Stonewall Riots.

transrants:

socialistexan:

This is what the cast of a Stonewall movie should look like, not what’s being cast.

These are just a few of the beautiful, incredible, unbelievably brave people who made our movement possible. Pay respect to the people who were involved in the Stonewall Riots by boycotting this planned whitewashed film about cis gay men and drag queens because it’s false and disrespectful to the trans women of color and the other extremely important marginalized groups that sparked the movement we have and benefit from today. Don’t allow this movie to further perpetuate the whitewashing of history and lies about who really was fighting in the Stonewall Riots.



The Sewol Ferry Disaster in South Korea. 

lostintrafficlights:

iwalkandtalk:

Please do not scroll past this. This is lengthy, but please take care to read it. Our government is lying to us and trying to shut up the efforts of the families of the missing who are trying to tell the truth.

1.There were constant miscommunications and false announcements in the process of the rescue mission.

On April 18th morning, there were reports on KBS that the mission team managed to enter the Sewol ferry, and that they were now in the dining room where many of the missing passengers were believed to be held.

image

(screencap of the KBS footage that was included in a report from Nyuseutapa(뉴스타파), a news report podcast.)

This was an official governmental report from the Central Disaster and Safety Management Ministry from the Safety Administration. However, there was another announcement an hour later from the Equipment and Technology minister of the maritime police, Myeong-seok Koh. The announcement was that the report was false. From about 11:30 a.m. to 15:30 p.m., different news websites made contrasting reports about the situation with some websites saying that the report was false and some saying that it was true. And at 15:30 p.m., there was another official announcement from the Central Disaster and Safety Management Ministry that the mission team had in fact failed to enter the ferry. It was later revealed that the maritime police’s position was that there was no confirmation whether the entering had succeeded or not, and yet the government decided to officially announce it without any solid information.

(There is a report about this which you can watch here.)

This is only one example of the constant false announcements from the government that were marked as official. At the initial stage of the disaster, the Central Disaster and Safety Management Ministry announced that 368 people had been rescued only to change it to 175 people. Even that number was later proved to be false when the father of one student searched literally everywhere - the Paengmok port (the port near to the site of the disaster), the hospital, even the sewers for his daughter. Only then was it confirmed that the announcement of 175 survivors was false and the daughter who had been on the rescued list was in fact one of the missing. Even when the government announced that there were 555 people, 121 helicopters and 69 ships working on the mission, that announcement was later confirmed to be false when the family of the missing saw that there were not even 200 people working on the mission. Also there were only 2 helicopters and 10 ships.

Even the report that a marine diver had lost his life on the search was later turned out to be untrue. The said marine had lost his life from falling while changing the light bulbs of one of the ships.

image

(One of the news outlets with the false report on the death of the marine.)

2. There is hardly anything being done on the rescue mission and the government announcements and the media reports are making it seem otherwise. During nighttime, star shells have to be used in order to continue the search and the government announced that they were doing so. However, when KBS was showing a footage of a star shell exploding and brightening the site of the disaster, (20:30 p.m.), civilian rescuers and two rescue teams were on standby because there were no star shells to work with. When the families of the missing requested for star shells to the person in charge, it took 20 minutes to get the permission for their use and 40 minutes for the plane they can use it with. 

Also, on the first night of the disaster, when the government had announced that the rescue mission was ongoing, the families of the missing borrowed a fishing boat and visited the site. According to the family member Joong-yeol Kim, there was not a single ship within 100m radius of the disaster site. Even when the family members approached right next to the ship, there was no rescue team or ship to stop them. 

(You can hear this interview here.)

And when president Geun-hye Park visited the site, the whole mission had to be paused for three hours for her visit.

3. The government is trying to stop the families of the missing from telling the truth. The families of the missing, angered by the constant false announcements and lack of control in resources decided to pay a protest visit the Cheongwadae (residential area of the president). It turned out that there were plain clothes policemen sent among them and they reported about this. Consequently, 10 police buses were sent and the police stopped the family members from advancing.

image

image

(Police members stopping the progress of the family members.)

TL;DR: The government is lying. They are saying they have concentrated huge amount of resources on the rescue mission and that they have made progress, but it is all a lie. IN FACT, THEY ARE ACTUALLY USING POLICE MEMBERS TO RESTRAIN THE FAMILY MEMBERS WHO ARE PROTESTING ABOUT THIS. THE FAMILY MEMBERS WHO HAVE POSSIBLY LOST THEIR CHILDREN, SISTERS, AND BROTHERS FOREVER ARE LITERALLY BEING STOPPED FROM TELLING THE PRESIDENT HOW LITTLE WORK IS ACTUALLY BEING DONE. PLEASE READ AND PLEASE SPREAD THIS.

하 저 씨발새끼들


“Women in their multitudes is something that needs to be seen more than men in their multitudes.” — Graeme Manson, regarding whether he ever considered a male lead for Orphan Black (x)



2014 Upcoming Fiction Reads Written By Authors of Color  

cielrouge:

Added some more titles so this is the most up-to-date list…

image

image

A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki (Jan 31st, 2013) - In Tokyo, 16-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century. A diary is Nao’s only solace—and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox—possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. 

Soy Sauce For Beginners by Kristin Che(Jan 7th, 2014):Gretchen Lin, adrift at the age of thirty, leaves behind a floundering marriage in San Francisco to return to her Singapore home, where she confronts the challenges of her mother’s alcoholism and her father’s artisanal soy sauce business before being pulled into a family controversy.  In the midst of increasing pressure from her father to remain permanently in Singapore—and pressure from her mother to do just the opposite—Gretchen must decide whether she will return to her marriage and her graduate studies at the San Francisco Conservatory, or sacrifice everything and join her family’s crusade to spread artisanal soy sauce to the world.

On Such a Full Seaby Chang-rae Lee (Jan 7th, 2014): In a dystopian American future where declining urban neighborhoods have been transformed into highwalled, self-contained labor colonies whose Chinese immigrant residents work catching fish for the surrounding elites. In this world lives Fan, a female fish-tank diver, who leaves her home in the B-Mor settlement (once known as Baltimore), when the man she loves mysteriously disappears. Fan’s journey to find him takes her out of the safety of B-Mor, through the anarchic Open Counties, where crime is rampant with scant governmental oversight, and to a faraway charter village, in a quest that will soon become legend to those she left behind.

 The Radiance of Tomorrowby Ishmael Beah (Jan 7th, 2014): Beah’s debut novel tells the story of two friends Benjamin and Bockarie, who return to their hometown, Imperi, after the civil war. The village is in ruins, the ground covered in bones. As more villagers begin to come back, Benjamin and Bockarie try to forge a new community by taking up their former posts as teachers, but they’re beset by obstacles: a scarcity of food; a rash of murders, thievery, rape, and retaliation; and the depredations of a foreign mining company intent on sullying the town’s water supply and blocking its paths with electric wires. As Benjamin and Bockarie search for a way to restore order, they’re forced to reckon with the uncertainty of their past and future alike.

 The Secret History of Las Vegas by Chris Abani (Jan 7th, 2014):  Salazar, a detective, is determined to solve a string of recent murders before he retires. He enlists the help of an expert in psychopathy, Dr. Sunil Singh, who is haunted by a betrayal of his loved ones in apartheid South Africa. But Sunil’s own troubled past is fast on his heels in the form of a would-be assassin.

 A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri (Jan 7th, 2014) - Growing up in a small rice-farming village in 1980s Iran, 12-year-old Saba Hafezi and her twin sister, Mahtab, are captivated by America. They keep lists of English words and collect illegal Life magazines, television shows, and rock music. So when her mother and sister disappear, leaving Saba and her father alone in Iran, Saba is certain that they have moved to America without her. As she grows up in the warmth and community of her local village, falls in and out of love, and struggles with the limited possibilities in post-revolutionary Iran, Saba envisions that there is another way for her story to unfold. And where Saba’s world has all the grit and brutality of real life under the new Islamic regime, her sister’s experience gives her a freedom and control that Saba can only dream of.

 Foreign Gods, Inc by Okey Ndibe (Jan 11th, 2014) - Foreign Gods, Inc., tells the story of Ike, a New York-based Nigerian cab driver who sets out to steal the statue of an ancient war deity from his home village and sell it to a New York gallery. As Ike travels back to Nigeria to steal the statue, he must deal with old friends, family, and a mounting conflict between those in the village who worship the deity, and those who practice Christianity. 

 The Death Class by Erika Hayashi (Jan 14th, 2014) - Why does a college course on death have a three-year waiting list?  When nurse Norma Bowe decided to teach a course on death at a college in New Jersey, she never expected it to be popular. But year after year students crowd into her classroom, and the reason is clear: Norma’s “death class” is really about how to make the most of what poet Mary Oliver famously called our “one wild and precious life.” By following her over four years, award-winning journalist Erika Hayasaki shows how Norma steers four extraordinary students from their tormented families and neighborhoods toward happiness: she rescues one young woman from her suicidal mother, helps a young man manage his schizophrenic brother, and inspires another to leave his gang life behind. Through this unorthodox class on death, Norma helps kids who are barely hanging on to understand not only the value of their own lives, but also the secret of fulfillment: to throw yourself into helping others.

 Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of American Maroons by Sylviane A. Diouf (Jan 17th, 2014) - Over more than two centuries men, women, and children escaped from slavery to make the Southern wilderness their home. They hid in the mountains of Virginia and the low swamps of South Carolina; they stayed in the neighborhood or paddled their way to secluded places; they buried themselves underground or built comfortable settlements. Known as maroons, they lived on their own or set up communities in swamps or other areas where they were not likely to be discovered. To survive, the American maroons reinvented themselves, defied slave society, enforced their own definition of freedom and dared create their own alternative to what the country had delineated as being black men and women’s proper place. Audacious, self-confident, autonomous, sometimes self-sufficient, always self-governing; their very existence was a repudiation of the basic tenets of slavery. (Nonfiction)

Boy in the Twilight: Hidden Stories of China by Yu Hua (Jan 21st, 2014) -  From the acclaimed author of Brothers and To Live: thirteen audacious stories that resonate with the beauty, grittiness, and exquisite irony of everyday life in China.

 The Secret of Magic by Deborah Johnson (Jan 21st, 2014) - In 1946, a young female attorney from New York City attempts the impossible: attaining justice for a black man in the Deep South. Regina Robichard works for Thurgood Marshall, who receives an unusual letter asking the NAACP to investigate the murder of a returning black war hero. It is signed by M. P. Calhoun, the most reclusive author in the country. As a child, Regina was captivated by Calhoun’s The Secret of Magic, a novel in which white and black children played together in a magical forest. Once down in Mississippi, Regina finds that nothing in the South is as it seems. She must navigate the muddy waters of racism, relationships, and her own tragic past.

Read More



angrywocunited:

[Trigger Warning: This video contains discussions on sexual slavery, abuse, rape, and violence]

COMFORT WOMEN WANTED, a very short documentary filmed by Chang-Jin Lee discussing the lives of Korean, Chinese, Taiwanese, Indonesian, Filipino, and Dutch “Comfort Women” survivors, and a former Japanese soldier. Comfort Women comprised of 200,000 young women and girls, referred to as “Comfort Women,” who were forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese Imperial Army. The title, COMFORT WOMEN WANTED, is a reference to the actual text of advertisements which appeared in Asian newspapers during the war. When advertising failed, young women and girls from Korea, China, Taiwan, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, and the Netherlands were kidnapped or deceived then forced into sexual slavery. These women and girls were raped and beaten by 50-100 soldiers a day at military rape camps, known as “Comfort Stations.” There are estimations that only 30% survived the ordeal. The “Comfort Women System” is considered the largest case of human trafficking in the 20th century. The remaining Comfort Women are now in their 80s/90s still waiting for a formal apology from the Japanese government, which has attempted to suppress, silence, and erase the issue to the extent of protesting the Comfort Woman statue. Just recently, the imbeciles at Gawking’s Valleywag published an article called “Start-up Flying Dateable Women to San Francisco Like It’s Imperial Japan” essentially trivializing and romanticizing the experiences of Comfort Women and stating it’s “inspiration” from the Comfort Women of World War Two. Many Asian and Asian American readers demanded the removal of the article and an apology. But the writer, Nitasha, wrote a lazy apology instead of constructing an in depth apology, and the article is STILL on their websiteDespite the growing awareness of the issue, this aspect of history has been at most unacknowledged. In this documentary, Chang-Jin Lee attempts to bring light on the organized violence against Comfort Women, and to create a constructive dialogue for the future by acknowledging their place in history.